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Cross-Post: Residents Will Walk Two Miles With Groceries To Show East Of The River Food Desert

Residents in Wards 7 and 8 are walking to demand the number and quality of grocery stores similar to those west of the Anacostia

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Chairman’s Corner: Why Are We Here?

Bread for the City’s Chairman of the Board, Paul R. Taskier, reflects on poverty, racism, food justice, the wealth gap, and why Bread for the City does what we do.

Ujima Farm
Ujima Farm
Ujima Farm
Ujima Farm
Ujima Farm
Ujima Farm
Ujima Farm
Ujima Farm
Ujima Farm
Ujima Farm

Food Justice with Brother Rashad and the Ujima Urban Farm

“Urban gardening is my form of organizing,” Brother Rashad told us. “What we’re doing here is what I started learning with Terrance Moore. We’re bringing the community together to overcome the challenges in accessing healthy food. We empower when we impart to the community that they don’t have to be dependent on toxic, unhealthy food, and then reintroduce them to their green thumbs.”

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More than 11% of D.C. is a Food Desert

A D.C. Policy Center report released Monday provides a current look at D.C.’s food deserts, taking into account more than just how many grocery stores are in a certain area. The report’s author, Randy Smith, points out that food access in the city is “deeply connected to both poverty and transportation.”

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Referral Advocacy – Data Driven Success!

If you follow this blog with any regularity you’ve probably seen several posts focusing on Bread for the City’s campaign to change the third-party referral system for local food pantries. Here a ‘referral’ means a written letter from an agency/organization vouching that a client ‘deserves’ access to food, clothing, furniture, or other goods. Referrals were required as proof of a client’s eligibility – regardless of any primary proofs they could provide on their own (income statements, lease etc).

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Delay the TANF Time Limit Cut & Protect 6,000 Vulnerable Families

In 2011, the District announced that it would implement lifetime time limits for receipt of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).

TANF is a federal benefit intended to provide income assistance, job training, and other services to low-income families with children. Before 2011, D.C. used local money to continue to provide the benefit for needy families even after they reached the 60-month limit covered by federal dollars.

After a series of gradual reductions, by October 2015 the District plans to terminate all TANF benefits for households who have received TANF for more than 60 months over the course of their lives. Without further action, more than 13,000 children in the District will fall deeper into poverty.

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Dig This!

There’s A LOT going on in our Sustainable Agriculture Department!

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DC Food Pantries Move Towards Reduced Barriers

We’re excited to announce a change that will help reduce and remove barriers for people seeking food resources.

BIG NEWS: We’re launching a newsletter in early 2020!

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