Just Logo Blog / Racial Justice

Post Image

A Call to Action: Building Neighborhoods that Work

Our CEO, George Jones has a simple message for DC: It’s time to build neighborhoods that work.

Post Image

Dreaming of a Better Tomorrow: Racial Equity in Housing Outcomes in D.C.

Our advocacy director, Aja Taylor on why it’s time to get serious about racial equity in housing outcomes — and how we can do it.

Post Image

Where We Stand: White Supremacy Without White Supremacists

We had a few thoughts following Unite the Right 2. And a challenge for our white allies…

Post Image

Where We Stand: We Wish We Were Wrong About D.C. General

We wish we were wrong about D.C. General. We aren’t, and there’s only one right thing for Mayor Bowser to do…

Post Image

Where We Stand: The Demolition of D.C. General

What this seems to be about, is keeping promises at the expense of people. But our question remains, promises to who?

Post Image

Where We Stand: Family Separation and Detention is Not a Humane Immigration Policy

Bread for the City strongly condemns the recent ICE arrests in NE D.C. and the Trump Administration’s policy decision to separate children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Post Image

From Police Shootings to Policy Making: The Dangers of Implicit Bias

Last week, Advocacy Director Aja Taylor offered testimony at the Department of Human Services budget hearing about the need for anti-racism training within city agencies to root out biases that lead to policies that continue to disadvantage the city’s Black and Brown residents. At Bread for the City, we work with residents living with low incomes to develop the power to determine the future of their own communities. Part of that work is calling out the people and policies that make life harder for those we serve. The following is a portion of Aja’s oral testimony.

Post Image

What Happens to a Dream Deferred? King’s Assassination, 50 Years Later

BFC’s CEO, George A. Jones, on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and our city’s critical need for policies that make amends for intentional divestment from Black communities.