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Tai Chi at BFC? Yup!

Hi, have we met? I’m Gail Knight. I lead workshops and discussion at Bread for the City to help reduce stress and balance the mind, body and spirit.

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It’s Kind of a Big Deal, Too!

Hey, guess what, everyone???

Bread for the City is pleased to announce that we received a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to provide quality primary care to under-served DC residents. And this grant isn’t just a new source of funding for us – it means that our clinic is officially a full Federally-Qualified Health Center! (Or FQHC –and brace yourself for more acronyms to come, as this is a blog post about the federal government).

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Bread’s Volunteer Program Gets a Boost thanks to the Taproot Foundation!

Over the past year, Bread for the City has had the pleasure of working with a team of pro bono human resource consultants in partnership with the Taproot Foundation. The goal of this partnership was to improve our volunteer program. Since our founding, service has been a pillar of our work at Bread for the City. Volunteers assist in all of our core service areas providing both direct and indirect services to help us accomplish our mission.

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You’re Invited: Cooking Demonstration with Chef Bob Tomorrow, August 4th!

Bread for the City is pleased to welcome back Chef Bob for a cooking demonstration at our SE Center tomorrow, Tuesday, August 4th at 11:00 AM! The demonstration will be led by Chef Bob with Gate Gourmet, an organization that specializes in in-flight catering. All are welcome to attend!

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Chairman’s Corner

This is the launch of a monthly series – “Chairman’s Corner” – where our Board Chair, Paul Taskier, will write about a variety of topics that impact Bread for the City and indeed the community and nation at large. We invite you to Read, Enjoy and Share!

We have all just witnessed momentous changes in our national landscape. June, 2015 will long be a month remembered for the changes it ushered in, or cemented in place.

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How Social Security Gets Racist Without Really Trying – Part 5

Normative Family Structures

On June 26, 2015, millions of Americans celebrated the Supreme Court’s decision to affirm the love and commitment of same-sex couples who asked, in the words of Justice Anthony Kennedy, “for equal dignity in the eyes of the law.”

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Blog Series: How Social Security Gets Racist Without Really Trying – Part 1

The Social Security Act (Act of August 14, 1935) [H. R. 7260] “An act to provide for the general welfare by establishing a system of Federal old-age benefits, and by enabling the several States to make more adequate provision for aged persons, blind persons, dependent and crippled children, maternal and child welfare, public health…”

Along with Medicare, to which Social Security’s success is inextricably linked, Social Security is the most successful anti-poverty measure in our country’s history.

Social Security keeps 22 million Americans out of poverty, including 15 million elderly Americans, according to research from Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and pays more money to children than any other government program. In the tattered remains of the American social safety net, Social Security remains of the strongest links.

But beneath the surface of this New Deal mainstay, there is a history, and a present reality of exclusion, discrimination, and loss.

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How Social Security Gets Racist Without Really Trying – Part 4

Race, Politics, and the Bogus Fight over Reallocation

Chris Jordan worked all his life. Mr. Jordan (a pseudonym) is a 52 years old African-American man and suffers from congestive heart failure. He grew up near Bread for the City’s Northwest Center and used to play basketball at the Kennedy playground, which has since become the Kennedy Recreation Center.

BIG NEWS: We’re launching a newsletter in early 2020!

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