Just Logo BFC In the News 2015

For all media inquiries, please contact Chief Development Officer, Andrea Messina,

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Bread for the City: USDA Owes Pantries Millions of Dollars More in Food

Bread for the City, a D.C.-based nonprofit devoted to poverty alleviation, has sued the U.S. Department of Agriculture for allegedly failing to buy the amount of food required by an act of Congress through the Emergency Food Assistance Program.

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Allison Miles-Lee, supervising attorney for BFC, said the DHS has struggled for years to communicate fluently with its steadily increasing clientele of non-English-speaking District residents.

With an increasing number of clients who speak little or no English, District caseworkers for food stamps and other types of aid repeatedly violate a 2004 local law mandating access to interpreters, a lawsuit filed Wednesday alleges.

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Bread for the City’s social workers are using technology to cut down on red tape to better serve impoverished DC residents.

At Bread for the City, a routine task delegated to a student intern more than a decade ago has now sparked a national movement.

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Bread for the City’s Community Health Nurse Gerald Sabb speaks about Naloxone and its use and access in DC.

In 2014, D.C. looked at expanding access to naloxone to limit heroin deaths. A year later, advocates and drug users are still waiting.

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More Than Bread Alone – A feature on Bread for the City and its services

If you put on your magic hat and conjured up an organization that addressed all the needs of DC’s low-income residents, it would probably look something like Bread for the City. From its beginning partnership with Zacchaeus Free Clinic in a church basement 40 years ago, Bread for the City has grown to a multi-facility powerhouse providing comprehensive services for over 33,000 DC residents a year.

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DC Employment Justice Center Expands Resources for East of the River Workers

Recognizing that workers living East of the River needed greater access to their services, last September the DC Employment Justice Center launched an expanded monthly clinic in Fairlawn. The clinic, which had previously been open every other Friday morning, is now open to clients on one Saturday each month.

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In a changing D.C., Martha’s Table plans a $20 million move to Southeast

Bread’s CEO George A. Jones: “People have always come from outside our Zip code to access our services.”

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Safety net clinics step up health IT standards

Many more digital than their peers in tony areas